Vibration Problem

March 2004

During (in the middle of) our last flight the ship began flying roughly.  It seemed to be something in the main rotor system so we thoroughly went over every aspect of the ships drive system from front to rear and found no anomalies whatsoever.  We did find a few things along the way.  If you tapped on the blades you could hear a noise in them like a baby's rattle so we removed both master and slave blade end plugs and found a few pieces of rivets inside them leftover from construction of the ship.  I knew they were in there back when I built the blades up but they were stuck deep inside the blades in the blade glue squeeze out from when RotorWay manufactured the blades.

     We also lifted up the boot cover on the main mast to see if everything was ok and found about 2/3 of the shaft had rust on it.  We put more grease in it and replaced the clamps.   This is something we've never checked as it isn't in any of the regular maintenance routines we've done so far, if it is, we never noticed it so be sure to regrease it.

Anyhow after all that and making sure the elastomeric bearings were free I hovered the ship again and the vibration is still there.   Folks on the ground said they could see the tail boom shaking up and down leading them to think it was a tracking problem.  Personally I think it's a lead lag thing.

At the moment we're grounded until we get one of Pro-Drives balancers unless we want to start tweaking things the old fashioned way, most likely screwing something else up lol.

 



 
Wednesday
March 17, 2004

After talking to John Spurling today about our problem, he gave us a list of things to check out.  After work, with 2 hours to achieve this goal before dark, Donna and I headed out through the rush hour traffic to the airport, (a 45 minute drive) to check the tracking of our rotorblades.  First was a low speed tracking test followed up by a high speed light on the skids test.   We got the ship out of trailer and fired it up and did the first test obtaining bad results right off the bat.   The stick was making marks on the master blade and no marks at all on the slave blade.  We did this test twice just to be sure and obtained the same result both times.  Next was doing it light on the skids at 100% RPM.  Donna made two marks on the blades this time, one at about 8 inches from the blade tips and the second about 16 inches from the end of the blades so we wouldn't have to perform this twice.  The end result was the first mark just like the second one was just the same as the low speed test.  The slave blade was definitely flying much higher than the master blade evident by the absence of a mark on the slave blade.  At that point we boxed the ship back up and headed home calling John on the way back.   From what John said it's just about a sure thing we're going to have to install new elastomeric bearings.  It's about the only thing that could change that much in such a short amount of time and arise in an inflight situation.  We're going to be gluing our end plugs in on our main rotorblades plus another mod I'll post on here when we do it.  Anyways, so we went ahead and purchased one of John's balancer units.  We know we can whip most of this by trial and error and get the ship running fairly smooth again without one but having one would make things go alot easier.  Not to mention our ship won't be close, it will be right on the money.  It doesn't take a rocket scientist to know that even a small amount of vibration in the ship can severely increase wear and tear on all kinds of things.  Another reason we want one is so we won't be so apprehensive about removing and replacing our rotorblades if we have one.

 



 
Thursday
March 18, 2004

Pro- Drive definitely has some pretty good service.

We ordered a Pro-Drive Balancer on Wednesday about 2:30 central time and received it Thursday morning at about 9 AM Eastern time. That's less than 24 hours and we had it, ya can't beat that for service lol.  Today about 2:30 PM we also called RotorWay and ordered a new set of elastomeric bearings, aligner block bearings and outboard and inboard pitch pins. While we we're at it we figured since well be coming up on the 100 hour service mark soon, we might as well go ahead and get the parts needed for that operation.  Donna ordered snap rings for the rotorhead, a fuel filter, spark plugs and a new safety clip for the ballast weight.  Our next step will be removing the main rotorblades this coming weekend.

              



 
Saturday
March 20, 2004

We got the blades off today and unfortunately found just what we were supposed to.  The slave blade elastomeric bearing for sure went bad on us.  From the looks of it grease from the bearing block was the cause of it.  When we built the ship and installed the blades here at home the first time we thought we were supposed to grease everything to the 9's.  We then took the ship to Oklahoma to John Spurling's to have it all checked over.  John spotted the grease right away and had me clean and remove it all except for the grease in the needle bearings.   Evidently I didn't get enough of it out of them because we for sure had grease soaked elastomeric bearings.  John says the grease attacks the glue the bearings are made with and causes them to delaminate.

         

This is what a bad elastomeric bearing looks like and to add insult to injury for some reason you replace them in sets so the price of the repair times two is $856.00.

Come to find out there is a cure for this problem

and we've decided it isn't going to happen to us any more so while we're at it we're going to replace the pitch pin needle bearings with a new setup from Pro-Drive that uses Delron bushings rather than the traditional needle bearings thus putting grease totally out of the picture.  The down side to using this type of setup is you just about have to have an electronic balancer to set the ship back up unless you want to be out there tweaking the blades forever lol.  The plastic bushings fit very snugly and you can't do a traditional lead lag adjustment because the blades can't teeter like they did with the factory needle bearings.  The upsides are no grease and no need to ever replace the pitch pins because the plastic doesn't put ridges into the pitch pins.  No ridges means no fracture risk on the pin and no seizing of the pitch pin bearings on the pin.  An example of what could happen would be the pin obtaining severe ridges and the needle bearing deteriorating to the point that is literally turns itself into a sprag clutch chomping down hard on the pin causing a fracture of the pin itself.  This is my understanding of it all and I may be incorrect on a couple of points so give John a call if you have any questions.

It's hard to see in this picture but if you look close you can actually see small dimples in the surface where foreign debris has gotten pinched between the bearing and the backing washer.  This shows the tremendous amount of pressure the blades put on these parts as they are in operation.  Hummmm... maybe if we put some peanut butter between there we could make some diamonds lol.  

 

 



 

Wednesday
March 24, 2004

Today our parts finally got here from RotorWay Via snail mail,

via DHL which turned out to be Airborne Services in drag.   We tried to find out their status several times during the week and even with a tracking number all they could ever tell us is they left Phoenix on Friday.  On the phone they did say we should have them by Thursday at the latest.  Odd way to run a shipping company.   Anyhow we got them boxed up and sent the parts John needed to install our new plastic bearings overnight via good ole UPS lol.  Freight charges are sure something that vary around the country. The US post office couldn't get them there overnight and wanted $32 bucks for two day service.  UPS being very proud of their services charged us a modest <gulp> $48 bucks but guaranteed it would be there tomorrow so they won out.   By the way, both of those prices also included insurance of $1000.00.   Prior to heading to the shippers we called RotorWay and got a replacement cost for all the parts in the event they got lost or something.  We're probably being unrealistic here but our goal is to be reassembling and balancing our ship this Saturday and lord willing be back flying again on Sunday.

 



 
Thursday
March 25, 2004

Got a call from John at Pro-drive tonight and he said the parts are on the way back and we should have them by noon Friday.

John went over the next steps with me while he had me on the phone about what to do after we get the ship back together.  It begins by drawing a string line across the blades vertical cord line.  Once we accomplish this step the lead lag will be as close as we can get it manually when the string is centered across the main rotorshaft.   To do this lead lag string thing we must first find the vertical cord line of the blades by drawing small lines on top of the blades 6 inches up from the trailing edge with a framing square every 2 feet along the entire length of the blades.  At the end of each blade once again 6 inches from the trailing edge we put a slight notch in the blade with a file or hacksaw for the string to lay in. Tying a small weight to the end of each line to hold it taunt we then cone the blades to allow the string to go over the center shaft.  At that point we're supposed to adjust the lead lag of the blades until the center of the string is dead center of the main shaft.  That is step one and if it's as easy as it sounds it shouldn't take too long.  I remember setting up the lead lag way back when once and it wasn't a simple task.  Every time Donna and I got it set and locked in the set screws it would always change things and we had to do it over and over again lol, so I've got a wait n see attitude at this point lol.

Once we get that part finished we're off the the next step of a low speed tracking test to see how the blades are tracking.  Once that comes out good we're to do a high speed light on the skids track test and while were at it take a reading on the balancer and see what we get. From there its IDONO lol, that's about all my head could hold so a call back to John is in our future for sure lol.

 



 
Saturday
March 27, 2004

 

These are the old parts we replaced.

If you look real close at the pitch pins you can see rust spots them and the grooves formed into the pins from the needle bearings.


 

These are pics of the inside of the Master and Slave rotorblades. 

 

      After taking the pictures of the insides of the blades we glued the end plugs in with blade glue.


 

Next was to mark them so we could see the vertical cord line of the blades.

We drew a mark like this every 24 inches along the length of the blades and 6 inches from the trailing edge to show us exactly where the vertical cord line was.  After we finished that we installed the aligner blocks.


 

The next step was to reinstall the blades back on the ship and do the string thing to get the lead lag as close as we could get it.

  

This is how we ran the string to set the lead/lag adjustment.

 
This turned out to be a pain in the ass to put it mildly lol. 
Once I figured out what did what to what it wasn't too bad to do.  The hardest part of it is trying to find a way to look directly down on the shaft from above while your trying to center it all up.


 

Here she is ready to go out to the airfield for the low speed track test


 

                    
The first picture is of the master blade and the second picture is the slave blade.

Using the marks for a reference,  the slave blade is flying higher than the master blade so
we gave John a call and he had us lower the pitch link rod on the slave blade 1/2 of a turn.


We did this again and again until we got the blades tracking at low speed and then more of the same thing until we got them tracking correctly at high speed.  Little did we know it but the marks we were leaving were way too high to be of any use so we ended up having to start over again until the marks were on the bottom of the edge and not on the leading edge of the blades.  Donna was doing her best to just tick the blades and by Sunday morning she was an expert at it lol.

We took one reading on the balancer at a hover

511 RPM
 1.71 IPS @ 009

We called John again and he said from those readings we obtained the next move was to lag the master blade about 1/32 of a turn.

After retightening the bolts on the master blade with my trusty torque wrench I decided it would be a good idea to make sure the bolts on the aligner block on the slave blade were correctly torqued to spec.  I put the torque wrench on one of the bolts and the wrench never even tried to click, it just kept on tightening and the second one did the very same thing.  At this point we were thinking our torque wrench had run amuck.  At any rate we were pretty sure we were out of business at that point for the rest of the weekend because we thought the bolts were stripped.  We decided to remove one of the bolts so it would be easier to obtain a match for a replacement from a friend close by and luckily to our surprise it was only the nuts that had stripped.

What happened was the washers on the bolts wore down and compressed to the extent that the nuts ran out of threads and tried to go up on the grip on the shaft of the bolts.  Some new washers and nuts and we were good to go.

The bad news was we were back to square one as far as lead lagging the blades goes and we were out of daylight so as luck would have it we would have to start all over again the next morning.

 



 
Sunday
March 28, 2004

Well here we go again on what turned out to be a seemingly never ending process.

We got up about 6:30am for the every Sunday morning fly-in breakfast here at the airpark which turned out to be a busy one since it was such a beautiful weekend.  Unfortunately it slowed us down due to the fact we couldn't get on the airfield until just about all of them left.  After we had our breakfast we worked on the lining up the lead/lag with the string again.  This time we got it alot closer than we did yesterday.  One thing that helped is we borrowed a tall ladder from a nearby hanger and combined with our two short ladders we could see what we were doing alot better then the day before.

                  On the first low speed track Donna made 4 marks

After we talked to John we had to stop doing that because he said as you go further toward the center of the blade we would get different readings.  He told us to only use one at the tip or at the most two marks as close to the tip as possible.

I could see John shaking his head right about then right through the phone lol.

Going by the marks closest to the tip the slave blade was a little high so we adjusted it lower.


 

               

Donna's marks on the second low speed track

The slave blade was still high so we adjusted it to lower it some more.


 

We adjusted it a little too much and only got a mark on the slave blade so we backed it up a little and took the next marks.


 

           

Yeah!!!

 The outside marks are both at 1 inch.

Now we can move on to the high speed sticking.



 

We took a light on the skids track which got a mark on the master blade and no mark on the slave blade
 and our first hover balance readings

Set 1 of the day

520 RPM
1.10 IPS @ 012

520 RPM
0.95 IPS @ 013

517 RPM
1.03 IPS @ 019


After calling John once again he said
(really starting to appreciate our nationwide long distance on the cell phone by now lol)

 
 to lag the master .008 or slave down 1/8 of a turn


 

             The next step,

This high speed track that turned out to be the one we had waited for all day.

This really great looking high speed track result meant we finally had it going on lol. After that fantastic moment was over we took another set of readings at a hover.

Set 2 of the day

522 RPM
1.00 IPS @ 014

521 RPM
1.11 IPS @ 007

528 RPM
1.00 IPS @ 009

 
After looking at our results on the chart and talking to John once again he said the next step would be

measuring panels 7th thru 15th of the master blade to find the highest one
and at that point to bend the remaining ones up to match the highest panel in that set.


             Finally only taking readings at a hover, no more stick work yeahhhh!

 

Set 3 of the day

Next we did a set of hover readings

513 RPM
0.87 IPS @ 015

520 RPM
0.91 IPS @ 020

527 RPM
0.93 IPS @ 011

Lagged master blade



 

Next we did another set of hover readings

Set 4 of the day

 

525 RPM
49.48 IPS @ 090
Bad reading

521 RPM
0.38 IPS @ 024

520 RPM
0.49 IPS @ 039



At this point we didn't make any changes after these readings.

After a call back to John he
said to take a set of cruise readings and another set of hover readings to determine next step.


 

Set 5 of the day

 

Hover Readings

Cruise Readings

520 RPM
0.51 IPS @ 050

505 RPM
0.82 IPS @ 307

516 RPM
0.46 IPS @ 056

514 RPM
0.72 IPS @ 299

510 RPM
0.37 IPS @ 051

 

512 RPM
0.76 IPS @ 307

From looking at the chart
(which we're starting to learn how to read it now lol)
both it and John said to add .05 gram to tip of master blade.

 

                   

Here were adding a bit of tip weight

which was replacing one of the small 3/8 long screws with one that was about 5/8 of an inch plus we added a small washer under it to get the results we were looking for.

Additionally at this time we also bent panels 7 thru 15 on slave blade up another .012 of an inch.  Once that was finished it was time to fire the ship up again and take it for another test run to gather more readings to see the results of what we had done.


 

 

Set 6 of the day

Hover Readings

Cruise Readings

522 RPM
0.22 IPS @ 258

515 RPM
0.26 IPS @ 259

514 RPM
.022 IPS @ 252

519 RPM
0.41 IPS @ 268

522 RPM
0.24 IPS @ 243

518 RPM
0.38 IPS @ 279

Interpreting the cruise readings the chart says our next step is

to bend panels 7 thru 15 on slave blade up another .008 thousands of an inch
and from the hover readings, the chart also shows that
we need remove .05 grams from the tip of master blade so we just removed the washer.

It is amazing what such a small amount of weight can do at the tip of the blades.

At this point in the game, when the ship is idling and the cyclic is in its proper place if it wasn't for hearing the engine running you wouldn't know it was lol.


 

As you can see here in the pics, we used up all the daylight today and ended up taking the last in flight and hover readings in the dark.

The balancer unit doesn't have a lighted panel on it so while I was in flight I had to read them with what little sunlight that was left with it shining through the door on the unit.  The first two readings weren't too bad to read but the third one was really tough to see.

After I got 3 in flight readings it was back to the airpark to take 3 hover readings before we were finished for the night and put the ship back in its box for the weekend.

 

Set 7 of the day

Our final readings for the night were:

Hover Readings

Cruise Readings

521 RPM
0.40 IPS @ 246

520 RPM
49.70 IPS @ 090

We knew this one wasn't right when we saw it.

513 RPM
0.30 IPS @ 230

517 RPM
0.28 IPS @ 187

518 RPM
0.31 IPS @ 271

524 RPM
0.28 IPS @ 184

These last readings we took at a hover didn't make any sense.

I'm pretty sure its because I had the switch on the balancing unit in the wrong position with the unit still reading from the vertical sensor.

We'll have to wait and see what we find next weekend when we start back at it again to know for sure.  As soon as we get a chance well scan and post the charts we used so you can see understand what were talking about a little easier.

 




 

Tuesday
March 30, 2004

We received some new parts in from RotorWay today. A new throttle grip for the pilots throttle that will hopefully add some friction to it and some new bolts and nuts for the rotorblades just in case we ever needed them.  The big main bolts that hold the blades on cost a whopping $24.00 each and that was alot to spend on something we may never need but when you need them you need them, that's a lesson we learned this past weekend on the aligner block bolts.

Today I also finished up a new mount for the strobe pickup unit on the balancer.  That last time up in the air doing the final reading I did Sunday night I got a no tach reading from the balance unit and just about had a bird thinking it the pickup had detached itself and was about to wrap itself into the rotor system.   My idea even if it doesn't do anything but make me feel better is to attach it with screws to the top lip of the dog house.  I'm not sure if it will be stable enough to work correctly but worse case scenario is I may have to add some duct tape to stabilize it.  Either way it will make me feel alot better about it not coming off the ship during flight.

 




Saturday
April 3rd 04

Today was more of the same, tweeking, tweeking and more tweeking.  We got a late start because of the cold today but it finally got warm and we got back to business.  We started out by mounting our new bracket to the dog house which took us awhile because we had to remove a 1/4 inch of metal from the leading edge of the brackets backing plate with a file lol.  Earl West One of the super nice folks that live here on the air park loaned me the use of his vice and a couple of files and in no time at all we had it completed and mounted on the ship.

 

 


The next step was to take more readings on the balancer in a hover to make sure where we were in the big picture of things once again. We fired the ship up and obtained these readings.

 

Hover Readings set 1

Hover Readings set 2

1/2 tank fuel
wind @ 11

2:20 PM, Fuel Fuel
Wind Calm, Temp 17 C

522 RPM
0.72 IPS @ 018

519 RPM
0.62 IPS @ 007

524 RPM
0.74 IPS @ 010

526 RPM
0.66 IPS @ 004

515 RPM
0.67 IPS @ 012

521 RPM
0.60 IPS @ 009

 


 

Set 3 of the day

Hover Readings

Cruise Readings

2:37 PM

526 RPM
0.72 IPS @ 009


523 RPM
0.71 IPS @ 002


525 RPM
0.68 IPS @ 010

Bearing Temp 115
Battery 13.2 volts

 

2:26 PM

524 RPM
0.20 IPS @ 169

521 RPM
0.36 IPS @ 181

516 RPM
0.21 IPS @ 154

 

               Marked then loosened master pitch link counter clockwise 1/8 turn


 

Set 4 of the day

Hover Readings

Cruise Readings

3:20 PM

527 RPM
0.97 IPS @ 356

525 RPM
1.09 IPS @ 350

522 RPM
0.95 IPS @ 002

3:25 PM

517 RPM
0.64 IPS @ 160

517 RPM
0.50 IPS @ 166

517 RPM
0.43 IPS @ 162

     Master pitch link clockwise 1/8 turn past original mark


Set 5 of the day

Hover Readings

Cruise Readings

3:46 PM

523 RPM
0.62 IPS @ 008

525 RPM
0.62 IPS @ 016

523 RPM
0.60 IPS @ 009

3:50 PM

517 RPM
0.27 IPS @ 196

523 RPM
0.17 IPS @ 163

518 RPM
0.20 IPS @ 231

               Master pitch link clockwise just short of 1/4 turn

 


    

 

             

Set 6 of the day

Hover Readings

Cruise Readings

4:23 PM

524 RPM
0.52 IPS @ 017

516 RPM
0.48 IPS @ 026

527 RPM
0.27 IPS @ 018

4:30 PM

515 RPM
0.24 IPS @ 231

536 RPM
0.16 IPS @ 243

524 RPM
0.23 IPS @ 236

Master pitch link clockwise 1/8 turn


 

From here on out Donna rode with me so we took the 2 ballast weights off the ship and took to the air to obtain more readings

 

Set 7 of the day

Hover Readings

Cruise Readings

4:36 PM

522 RPM
0.14 IPS @ 027

523 RPM
0.25 IPS @ 032

527 RPM
0.16 IPS @ 020

4:40 PM

518 RPM
0.26 IPS @ 276

516 RPM
0.29 IPS @ 299

523 RPM
0.19 IPS @ 277

Master pitch link clockwise 1/8 turn


These pics are just some we thought we'd share.

Check out that full moon in the background in the center pic.

We had alot of static on the cell phone and the com radio all day today, maybe thats what caused it who knows lol.


 

Set 8 of the day

Hover Readings

Cruise Readings

5:51 PM

516 RPM
0.17 IPS @ 026

521 RPM
0.16 IPS @ 013

532 RPM
0.13 IPS @ 032

 

Didnt take
a cruise
reading at this time

Master pitch link clockwise 1/8 turn


 

Set 9 of the day

Hover Readings

Cruise Readings

6:10 PM

522 RPM
0.06 IPS @ 096

530 RPM
0.17 IPS @ 082

529 RPM
0.17 IPS @ 114

6:12 PM

526 RPM
0.77 IPS @ 321

513 RPM
0.69 IPS @ 304

518 RPM
0.74 IPS @ 320

We went too far, master pitch link counter clockwise 1/8 turn


 

Our final readings for the day.

 

Set 10 of the day

Hover Readings

Cruise Readings

6:38 PM

514 RPM
0.16 IPS @ 073

525 RPM
0.17 IPS @ 068

532 RPM
0.09 IPS @ 032

6:44 PM

521 RPM
0.44 IPS @ 319

531 RPM
0.48 IPS @ 317

517 RPM
0.49 IPS @ 320

                    The best we can tell our next move next weekend will be to back up the master pitch link 1/8 turn
to get back to where we had our best reading and start again from there.




Saturday
April 10th
2004

Today wasn't much different than last weekend, readings, adjustments, reading adjustments and then more readings and adjustments lol.  We started out by moving the master blade pitch link back counter clockwise 1/8 turn in an effort to get back to our prior reading we had last weekend.

In doing so I stripped out another nut on the master pitch link eyebolt.   This wasn't a good thing because if we screwed it up by not getting the length exactly the same it would throw off everything and we may have to start at the beginning again.

We took our trusty calipers and took a measurement from the pitch link rod to the exact center of the eyebolt.   Using that measurement we assembled the new rod end on the pitch link.

After installing the new eye bolt we fired the ship back up and took new readings.

We did that and brought the ship up to a hover and got great hover readings.
Next we took to the air for some inflight readings.

This is the view we have coming in on final at our home base, Seymour Airpark

Hover Readings

Cruise Readings

12:03 PM

522 RPM
0.14 IPS @ 073

523 RPM
0.09 IPS @ 034

521 RPM
0.15 IPS @ 073

12:06 PM

523 RPM
0.49 IPS @ 321

520 RPM
0.39 IPS @ 323

522 RPM
0.39 IPS @ 315

These readings said we needed to once again to move the
master pitch link back another 1/8 turn.


 

Low and behold at a hover it put us just about right on the center of the chart.

The forward flight readings went out just a bit further though so it was time to give John Spurling a call and discuss what our next move was going to be.

Hover Readings

Cruise Readings

12:39 PM

526 RPM
0.06 IPS @ 094

524 RPM
0.15 IPS @ 091

524 RPM
0.16 IPS @ 067

12:42 PM

522 RPM
0.28 IPS @ 295

519 RPM
0.39 IPS @ 308

521 RPM
0.32 IPS @ 304

We get quite abit of company through out the course of a day here and it never fails that right when we're doing something we that requires our complete attention someone comes along to chit chat.

While I was shooting the bull with the fellows, John and Donna derived that we were finished adjusting the master pitch link and

the next move was to once again bend panels 7 through 15 on the master blade up 4 thousands of an inch and at the same time add a very small thin washer to the tip of the master blade.


   

This is a picture of where the master pitch link ended up at.

You can see by the marks it dosn't take much movement at all to change the tracking of the blades by leaps and bounds.  The marks you see here from the center of the eyebolt to the left are just about in the middle of the span of 1/8th increments we made in a counter clockwise direction.

 

This are pictures of where our Slave blade ended up

 

This is the blade thingie we used to measure and set our trailing edges with.

We purchased it from John Puhlman at Homers Fly In a couple of years ago.  It came as a complete unit with the dial indicater included.  This is similar to another item Rotorway and John Spurling of Pro-Drive sells except the Pro-Drive unit is much more precision not to mention alot more user friendly.  John's unit is more costly but it makes this one look like a toy and it makes taking these measurents alot easier not to mention much more precise.

Once that was accomplished we went out and obtained these readings.

Hover Readings

Cruise Readings

1:40 PM

517 RPM
0.06 IPS @ 344

517 RPM
0.09 IPS @ 336

513 RPM
0.08 IPS @ 003

1:47 PM

519 RPM
0.31 IPS @ 276

516 RPM
0.33 IPS @ 279

517 RPM
0.29 IPS @ 267

519 RPM
0.31 IPS @ 272

From the information on the charts

our next move was to once again bend panels 7 though 15 up another 4 thousands of an inch.


 

Coming in on final after obtaining the in flight readings.

 

Hover Readings

Cruise Readings

2:35 PM

524 RPM
0.14 IPS @ 020

521 RPM
0.18 IPS @ 002

522 RPM
0.17 IPS @ 016

2:38 PM

519 RPM
0.30 IPS @ 224

519 RPM
0.30 IPS @ 226

520 RPM
0.22 IPS @ 233

After viewing these charts we decided that this was about as close as we we're going to get and
called it a done deal and this little venture had come to a happy ending for now anyway lol.
We want to fly some before we have to do our 100 hour service.


 
What we learned from this little venture:
#1

We're sure glad we have one of John's balancers.  We couldn't imagine doing this the old fashioned way.  From what we can tell there isn't any way anyones machine could be set up correctly without this thing.  I'm sure a fellow like Homer Bell or the folks at RotorWay could put it in the center of that chart without a balancing unit but there's no doubt in our mind it would take months if not years of experience to master such a thing not to mention take forever to do.  Having the readings on the charts at hand also allowed us to see and feel the difference from one adjustment to another of how such a small negative or positive input can be the difference between something that shakes your teeth out or something as smooth as a new car.  Prior to this experience you would of had a hard time convincing me that bending a few panels as little as 4 thousands of an inch or moving a pitch pin a mere 1/8 of a turn could have made any difference at all.

 
#2

We learned about is how fragile the trailing edge of the rotorblades are.
It took quite abit of effort to bend the trailing edges up but if you so much as put a slight amount of pressure with your fingers on a spot between the panels they would move it as much as 30 thousands of an inch and you wouldn't even think you had an affect on them so don't ever so much as even touch those edges especially with downward pressure. 

#3

You can get by with an old style dial indicator tool all right but there's no way that 6 inch duck bill vice grip pliers can compare to a good reflex bender tools such as the one Pro-Drive sells so if you skimp on a tool don't do it on that one.  With the wide duck bill pliers you can't efficiently bend the trailing edge at the points where the rivets are so what we ended up with is a trailing edge that looks like a waffle board to a dial indicator varying as much as 50 thousands of an inch the entire length of the blade.  You can bet that's a tool that makes our future Christmas list lol.




 

Sunday

Happy Easter Day!

April 11th
2004

  We started out our day with the folks at the Fly Inn Breakfast.  Unfortunately there wasn't much attendence today due to the rain that had set in upon our area.  There wasn't a single plane today but just prior to heading up to breakfast at about 8:00 am it looked like we almost had a hot air ballon make it in for a landing at the airpark.  We watched them coming in on a southwest wind toward us but they never quite made it to us.  About 1/4 mile short of the air park the wind shifted on them and was now coming in from the north northwest and was heading them toward the ridge that would take them into the Smoky Mountains and probably no good landing areas for a while lol.   Donna and I think that rather than get blown south over the Smokey's they sat her down about midfield of the runway in a pasture about a 1/4 mile south of the airpark.

From these pictures you can pretty much see the weather is just a tad below the VFR minimums.

I'm not real sure because we couldn't check the weather data but I don't think these folks were supposed to be up there today.


After the breakfast fly in this morning it was back to work for us.

Today we removed all that duct tape and the balancing equipment, reinstalled the doors and with a spray bottle wash job and restored the ship back to the bristle bug free condition it was in prior to this little episode.  All except for the main blades which we will have to wait for a pretty day to get it out of the trailer and clean those.

YEahhhh!!  # 1

Removal of the sensors, brackets and wires of the balancing unit.

 

Yeah!! # 2

Reinstalling the doors

We've been freezin our butt's off during most of these flights and while it may not mean much to some folks out there it sure was a great moment for Donna and I lol.

Well as life would have it the weather folks who said all this yuckie weather was going to blow itself out of here around noon lied, magin that lol.   Our daughter Brandy who had the day off work today came out anticipating going for another ride but once again got her bubble busted.  Of course she knew it before she drove out there because she had access to TV and the internet and brought us a copy of the radar image from weather.com.

The good news is luckly for us the Easter Bunny made a vist to the Airpark last night and left her a basket full of goodys.

You can just imagine how pleased she's going to be about having it announced here on the internet that at the ripe old age of 17 she still gets vists from the Easter Bunny but what the heck Donna and I's bruises will heel up in no time at all lol.

All Weekend, in between tweeking our heli and yackin with our friends we also practiced our pyrotechnique since we're sure its also one of them there perishable skills.  We reduced a big ole pile of logs and stuff to a mear pitance by sunday afternoon lol.

 

 The End!!